Pros And Cons Of Using Android Pay On The Go With Mastercard

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Android pay is still fairly new to the public and while both users and merchants are still getting used to the new way of paying for items on the go, I decided to go a weekend without my physical Mastercard, Oyster card and my other bank cards to see how I get on.

Using Android Pay on the go with Mastercard UK Video:

First thing first, is to link my Mastercard to my Android pay account. This was very easy and straightforward, you open up Android pay app, scan or enter your card details manually with some minor information and you’re ready to go. Providing you have a payment card that is supported, it’s a very simple process.

Once your payment card is linked, you just need to use as you would with any contactless payment points.  Your Android device will need to be supported and have NFC in order for it to work.  What I really liked about using my smartphone to pay for things is how I don’t have to leave the app I’m using to pay.  For example, if I’m in the middle of replying to an important email, I don’t have to stop or close down the app to pay for my coffee or tap to go on the London underground.

What else? I can see every transaction as I go along and with TFL, I can even see the locations of use, making it safe to use. The maximum spend is £30 per single transaction and the maximum is £100, but there’s a catch; for safety reasons, you can spend up to £30 without having to unlock your smartphone, but you to go beyond that spend-limit, you will need to unlock your device.  So if you have a smartphone with fingerprint, pin or pattern, you just need to ensure it’s very secure.

Oh did I forget to mention you can even use it to pay in some apps; apps like Zara and JD Sports allow you to purchase items on the move without setting foot in the actual shops – talk about convenience and technology making us lazy.

So what are the downsides? 

Well, most of the downsides are nothing to blame Android Pay for or Mastercard for that matter, but it’s all about where you can use it. Some shops are still behind when it comes to contactless payment, so you can’t use it there. With some shop items above £30 and £100, some retailers won’t bother with contactless as you can’t buy in there anyway, making it a little limited to use.

Do you use Android Pay? Share your experience or tips and tricks in the comments or over on Twitter @gadgetsboy.

 

Android Pay on the go, in partnership with Mastercard UK. All opinion are mine.

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About Author

I love gadgets and technology, so i write about them. +Tomi Adebayo

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